Transit Survival Kit: What You Need

For decades, the car has been king throughout the United States, and our car-culture means that from age 16 we’re conditioned to consider “but where will I park” above nearly all else. It is  undeniable that driving allows for a personal, moveable space where you can sing loudly, drink a milkshake from the drive-thru and store multiple outfit options in the trunk, but with our transit survival kit you’ll be a pro on the bus no matter how car-attached you are.

  • Backpack: you need somewhere to store your stuff, and a backpack is practical for sitting, standing, and waiting. Learn how you can earn a free Choose Your Way Bellevue backpack!
  • Water bottle: you never know when you’ll feel parched, and with traffic as unpredictable as it is, best to have some thirst quenching water at the ready.
  • Hand sani: our local transit agencies do an amazing job keeping buses and shelters clean and tidy, but sometimes you encounter something sticky or you just want to clean your hands after holding onto the rails of the bus. Now you can!
  • Headphones, book, puzzle, entertainment! A major perk of taking the bus is having time to do, well, anything you want on the ride. Watch a film, listen to a podcast, or read a book.
  • Your ORCA card – and maybe a lanyard, although you can tap your ORCA card without taking it out of your wallet; just tap the side of your wallet on the scanner!
  • Tissues: this time of year people are sniffley; you’re a people, too.
  • Something reflective and a little flashlight: it gets dark early these days. Be safe and seen by attaching something to your backpack that reflects headlights for the walk to and from your stop. Also keep in mind that at night, bus drivers are sometimes willing to drop you off in-between stops as long as it’s a safe location to do so.
  • Walking shoes: yes you look great in those dress shoes or heels, but leave them under your desk or in your backpack on transit–It’s simply more comfortable and easy.
  • An extra layer: buses are heated and air-conditioned, and get warm when they’re packed with people, and cold when the windows are open. Be the perfect temp with an extra layer at hand.

Still have questions? Know of something we forgot on our list? Contact us!

This entry was posted on Friday, January 11th, 2019 at 11:13 am and is filed under Bus, Commute Planning, Construction. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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