Archive for the ‘Carpool’ Category

The time has come to change Just One Trip and get rewarded! Just One Trip could be the catalyst to change not only your commute, but your life. The average American spends nearly an hour commuting every day, and now’s your chance to reclaim that hour for you. Catch up on the news, take a nap, make new friends, or be the best dog-gone Bejeweled player there ever was.

Get on that bus. Join that carpool. Dust off that bike in your garage. Heck, that extra walk could do us all some good. To show you how much they believe in you, King County Metro will give you a One-Time $100 Emergency Ride Home credit to use with Uber, Lyft or taxi as well as a $25 reward when you take the plunge and log your trips and complete a follow-up survey. Enrollment closes March 31, 2017. Sign up today and start reducing your drive alone trips!

Already signed up? Make sure to log your trips to unlock your Follow Up Survey in the Community In Motion network!

Tell us your non-drive-alone commute story!

King County Metro wants to hear about your commute! Are you a sleek, spandex-wearing bike commuter? Are you a book-reading, back-of-the-bus rider? Maybe you’re a carpool DJ outside office hours. No matter your mode, send us a photo and a story of your commute to inspire others!

Disclaimer: By sending King County Metro your story you agree that your story and photo can be shared without limitations including but not limited to KBCS radio’s “Unmute the Commute” program.

Wednesday, March 15th, 2017 12:36 PM | by Paige Anderson | Add a Comment

Groups of two or more commuters who regularly drive together to participating park and rides may be eligible to apply for carpool parking permits. King County Metro and Sound Transit each own and operate distinct park and rides and each have similar HOV permit programs; pricing and eligibility vary depending on location.

Applicants will be required to register with basic contact information and ORCA card numbers, Vanpool ID, or RideshareOnline.com email account for each member of a carpool. Regular transit ridership is not required for initial issue of a permit, but once a permit is issued ORCA numbers, Vanpool, or RideshareOnline.com will be checked to verify regular transit ridership. At least two carpool members must average three days of ridership per week (12 days per month) to qualify for monthly permit renewals.

The King County Metro carpool parking permits are free and are available to carpoolers meeting vanpools, buses, trains or private carpools at Eastgate, Issaquah Highlands, Northgate, Redmond, South Kirkland, and South Renton.

The Sound Transit park and ride permits cost $5 per month and are available to carpoolers continuing on to catch a bus or train at Angle Lake Station, Auburn Station, Issaquah Transit Center, Kent Station, Puyallup Station, Sumner Station, Tukwila International Boulevard Station and Tukwila Sounder Station.

Still looking for a carpool partner? Search for your carpool partner here.

Learn more and apply now!

Thursday, February 9th, 2017 10:16 AM | by Paige Anderson | Add a Comment

They say it’s taboo to break-up on Valentine’s Day, but this year, we encourage you to do so. Break up with your old commute! Stop sitting in traffic all alone, or simply try something new! Maybe your relationship with the bus has gone stale and that shiny vanpool’s caught your eye; or maybe you’re in need of a partner who’s more outdoorsy and has two wheels… Choose Your Way Bellevue is here to be your matchmaker.

So, how do you find a ridematch anyway? It’s as easy as 1-2-3 with Choose Your Way Bellevue.

Watch the video: http://bit.ly/2jIiyY8

Intimidated by biking Downtown? Use our Downtown Bellevue Bike Map to find a route that’s your speed.

What’s the bus got to do with orcas? Choose Your Way Bellevue will catch you up with all the tips and tricks.

As always, we’re here to help with your questions. Now get out there and meet your (commute) match!

Friday, February 3rd, 2017 3:38 PM | by Paige Anderson | Add a Comment

The South Bellevue Park-and-Ride will be closed for approximately five years during construction. ST Express buses 550, 555 and 556, and Metro buses 241 and 249 will continue to serve Bellevue Way Southeast next to the closed park-and-ride during construction. The future South Bellevue Station will include bus and paratransit transfer facilities and a 1,500-stall parking garage. Sound Transit expects to receive a construction schedule from the contractor soon that will identify the closure date, to be announced through East Link construction alerts. Stay informed by subscribing to Sound Transit’s East Link alerts at soundtransit.org/subscribe.

With a closure like this, it’s a great time to evaluate all of your options and we’re here to help.

Sound Transit identified replacement and existing park-and-ride lots with additional parking capacity and also expanded service on routes traveling to downtown Seattle and Bellevue. Visit the links below to discover replacement park-and-ride lots and new routes to find an alternative lot that works best for your lifestyle and location. There may even be a carpool or vanpool option that can get you to your destination.

We realize the park-and-ride closure may have a big impact on your commute. If you would like help navigating your options, fill out a custom commute planning inquiry and the Choose Your Way Bellevue team will help you find your way. You can always visit ChooseYourWayBellevue.org for information about alternatives to driving alone.

Choose Your Way Bellevue has created a new “East Link and Travel Options” page to help you get around during East Link construction. The new page will be updated with relevant information throughout the various stages of construction as they emerge, including frequent commute plans we’ve created for commuters. Let us know how we can support you during this change in our environment!

-Augusta, Choose Your Way Bellevue staff

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017 10:26 AM | by augusta | Add a Comment

It’s easy to see the correlation between not exercising and looking silly on your hiking date or not flossing and emitting potent halitosis, but less obvious is the correlation between your daily commute and your health and wellbeing.

Before you go checking WebMD and discover that you need to amputate a limb, it’s important to remember that there are many variables to consider when evaluating your commute. Depending on how and how far you travel each day, your risks may be different. For example, traveling more than ten miles each direction is associated with high blood sugar; commute distance is also related to blood pressure and body mass index. Not to mention the prolonged exposure to air pollution and the risk of lung diseases, heart attack, and stroke.

Image thanks to: www.erwinwurm.at

Image thanks to: erwinwurm.at

Even depression, anxiety, and social isolation are greater risks for those driving to and from work alone. Psychologists have found that mental health issues are a result of not just earth-shattering events, but also minor emotional experiences can manifest into negative psychological expression up to ten years later.

 

 

It has also been found that a commute of more than 45 minutes is correlated with lower sleep quality and more exhaustion than those with shorter commutes. Issues stemming from of lack of sleep are myriad, including an effect on attention, long-term memory, impulse behavior, lower immunity, and other problems.

However, not all hope is lost. If you a part of a carpool, vanpool or vanshare, that social time is thought to be having a positive effect on your health and wellbeing in the long term.

He takes the bus. Image thanks to: rollingstone.com

He takes the bus. Image thanks to: rollingstone.com

If you choose to ride your bike to work you’ll not only save money, but you’ll reap the health benefits of a regular exercise regime and reduce negative impacts on the environment.

Taking the bus can also be a cost-effective and stress-free way to commute. All that time you’d be focused on the road you could be reading, dozing, or maintaining a celebrity-sized social media presence. Busing also has positive health benefits, because even though you may walk just a few hundred yards to the nearest stop, that adds up over the week. In fact, even standing and balancing on the bus is considered a core workout (goodbye belly, hello abs!).

Don’t forget that combining modes may be your best bet for your commute.

If you’d like help planning your new commute don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Thursday, October 6th, 2016 11:11 PM | by Paige Anderson | Comments Off on Commute Consequences

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