Archive for the ‘Drive’ Category

Augusta is the Bellevue Downtown Association Membership Director and occasionally commutes with Patrick, who is the Bellevue Downtown Association President.  Here is her experience using Scoop, a new carpool app that launch on the Eastside this year:

We’d been carpooling occasionally for a few months – maybe once a week. It was easy to coordinate since Patrick works in the same office as I do. We’d coordinate the night before an early meeting or if I had bused in the morning and was working late, occasionally he’d drive me home. My house is on the way home for him – and he claims he doesn’t mind the company.

When we heard Scoop was launching we thought we’d give it a go to see how the system worked, whether we’d get matched and how much the trip would cost for me and how much I’d be paying him.

We both downloaded the app, and set up our profiles. It was pretty easy to set up – it just asked for my name, phone number, email address and employer in case my employer had a subsidy program. Even though I’d been a rider, I signed up to be a driver too and that took about 60 seconds. I put in my car’s make and model, year, color, license plate and driver’s license number and I was approved within five minutes. Easy-peasy. I even added a picture of myself so my profile felt complete.

So the next evening by 9:00 p.m. we scheduled our carpool for the next morning. Here are the steps I took to schedule:

  • I selected if I would ride or drive
  • I selected the 15-minute window I’d prefer to be picked up (between 8:00-8:15)
  • Patrick did the same
  • Then by 9:15 p.m. I received a notification that I’d be carpooling with Patrick and to be outside my house by 8:15. I could click on the ride and it showed a route that Patrick might take, and what time he’d be estimated to be at my house. I could message him through the app, and call if needed.

We had both previously opted to “favorite” each other’s profile so we wanted to see if that would mean we’d automatically match. It’s early on in Scoop’s Bellevue launch – but sure enough, our times and carpool matched up. My trip cost me $4 and he made $3. The best part was he was finally getting paid for these trips!

Either of us could also have opted to use Scoop to carpool home with a different carpool partner, but Patrick had a later meeting and I was meeting up with a friend so we made it home with different modes. The flexibility was nice! I think if I continue I’ll prefer using Scoop for the morning commute. Have you tried it yet? What did you think?

-Augusta, Downtown Bellevue Commuter and Honorary Choose Your Way Bellevue Staff

Learn more about Scoop and other ridematching apps on the CYWB Apps & Technology page.

Tuesday, March 13th, 2018 3:13 PM | by augusta | Add a Comment

From the City of Bellevue: On Sept. 5, the city began a three-month pilot traffic mitigation program that is intended to discourage commuter traffic from using some neighborhood streets during East Link light rail construction.

Traffic studies show that commuters often access Bellevue Way in the evening commute hours via neighborhood streets. In response to concerns about the increase of this traffic since light rail construction started on Bellevue Way and 112th Avenue Southeast this summer, temporary turn restrictions are being piloted and enforced.

The pilot includes two restrictions that are in effect Monday through Friday, 4-7 p.m. At 108th Avenue Southeast, a no-through restriction prohibits through travel (southbound) at Southeast 16th Street; if motorists travel this stretch when the restrictions are active, they will have to turn right (west) onto SE 16th St. The turn restriction on Southeast 16th Street at Bellevue Way will prohibit travel (westbound) on Southeast 16th Street and left turns (southbound) travel to Bellevue Way. The restrictions do not apply to people bicycling or to transit vehicles, including public and school buses. The pilot utilizes signs and flashing beacons to call attention to the locations where turns are restricted.

Downtown employees are asked to plan their commutes in advance due to light rail construction occurring south of Main Street. If you are interested in taking the bus but have been hesitant to do so, consider a $25 ORCA card through Choose Your Way Bellevue. In addition to the bus, there are many other ways to get around Bellevue.

To read a detailed flyer about the pilot, go to www.bellevuewa.gov/ELtraffic.

Traffic monitoring is being conducted throughout the pilot and the results will be shared with the Neighborhood Traffic Mitigation Committee (NTMC). The NTMC was formed in 2016 to work with the City on recommending traffic mitigation that would discourage commuter traffic on neighborhood streets during East Link construction on Bellevue Way and 112th Avenue SE.

Let Choose Your Way Bellevue know if you have questions and don’t forget to check out these other East Link resources:

-Choose Your Way Bellevue Staff

Thursday, September 28th, 2017 1:13 PM | by admin | Add a Comment

From Franz Loewenherz, City of Bellevue Transportation Dept.

In 2016, road crashes resulted in 40,000 deaths and 4.6 million injuries in the United States. For young people under age 19, these collisions were the leading cause of death.

What if we could use technology to predict where vehicle collisions involving pedestrians and bicyclists will occur, then take steps to prevent them? Would you want to help? Well, now you can.

This work is part of a multi-city, multi-organizational partnership called Video Analytics Towards Vision Zero. As indicated in this ITE Journal Article, this technology development partnership aims to use footage from traffic cameras across North America to “teach” computers how to recognize near-miss collisions. Data from these machine learning systems will allow transportation engineers to predict where crashes will occur and take proactive measures to prevent them.

The partnership invites public participation in the next project milestone – using crowdsourcing to analyze video and teach computers to identify a person in a wheelchair, on a bike or in a car, as well as patterns of movement in intersections. The more volunteers who take part, the better computers will learn to recognize near-miss collisions.

To participate visit: http://www.ite.org/visionzero/videoanalytics/

Here’s how it works: volunteers will view a short clip of a pre-recorded traffic scene, then label and track the movement of each person or vehicle within the screen. By doing so, the computer can begin to distinguish a person walking, biking, or using a wheelchair; a bus or car; then recognize patterns of near misses. Fair warning to potential volunteers – until you get accustomed to using the labeling tools, it may take you several minutes to complete the task – plan on at least five minutes or longer per task at the start. Once you master the image tracking tools, your speed will increase. You can submit just one task, or complete as many as you’d like. Volunteers are needed starting June 1.

For additional information on this partnership please contact Franz Loewenherz, project manager of the Video Analytics Towards Vision Zero Partnership, at +1-425-452-4077 or floewenherz@bellevuewa.gov.

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017 3:05 PM | by admin | Add a Comment

Compiled from WSDOT and Sound Transit sources

Over the weekend of June 3, the Washington State Department of Transportation and Sound Transit opened a new high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane in each direction of Interstate 90 between Mercer Island and Seattle, and permanently closed the express lanes. This allows Sound Transit to start construction of the 14-mile East Link light rail extension from Seattle to Redmond.

The new mainline HOV lanes will facilitate an I-90 commute that doesn’t depend on the direction of the express lanes, giving Eastside employees who reside in Seattle the option to take the bus or try a vanpool with increased reliability. The I-90 Trail remains open and unchanged for those who use it to bike, run or walk. Buses between Seattle and the Eastside will continue to use the same routes and stops they do today.

How has this affected your commute? We’d love to hear.

Read more about the project here.

-Choose Your Way Bellevue Staff

Monday, June 19th, 2017 12:34 PM | by Paige Anderson | Add a Comment

King County Metro secured a special deal with Diamond Parking Service to provide long-term guaranteed parking for transit users: http://www.parkbytransit.com/. You can find a Parking Spot with Diamond Parking Service that is close to transit through their locations list and even filter the results based on the Bus Route you use (https://www.parkbytransit.com/Location). Need to get to Seattle? The following Diamond Parking Service Lots can get you there with just one bus:

Bell Centre: 308 108th Ave NE (Bellevue, WA)

  • Direct to Downtown Seattle: 550 [ST]
  • Direct to U District: 555 [ST], 556 [ST], 271

The Belcarra: 10688 NE 10th St (Bellevue, WA)

  • Direct to Downtown Seattle: 550 [ST]
  • Direct to U District: 555 [ST], 556 [ST], 271

106th Ave Lot: 1001 106th Ave NE (Bellevue, WA)

  • Direct to Downtown Seattle: 550 [ST]
  • Direct to U District: 555 [ST], 556 [ST], 271

The Aviara: 2441 76th Ave SE (Mercer Island, WA)

  • Direct to Downtown Seattle: 550 [ST]

Spaces will be available beginning June 1st, right in time for the S. Bellevue Park-and-Ride Closure. Sign up today for low monthly rates now and your first month is FREE!*

*Spaces are available on a first-come first-serve basis

-Choose Your Way Bellevue Staff

Thursday, June 15th, 2017 9:45 AM | by admin | Add a Comment

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