Archive for the ‘Ferry’ Category

session board

Photo by TransportationCamp on Flickr

We at Choose Your Way Bellevue are geeked (literally) to report back from Transportation Camp, which took place in San Francisco this past weekend. A great mix of entrepreneurs, transit nerds, policy makers, activists, and students assembled under a disco ball to tackle the question: How can we use data to improve our cities and transportation systems?

Sponsored by Open Plans and the Rockefeller Foundation, Transportation Camp is a relatively new concept referred to as an “unconference”(also popular in the tech world because they reflect the culture of the industry) with a hands-on, flexible, a little casual but very hard working and fun to the extreme approach. Instead of a set schedule and droning speakers, every attendee at Transportation Camp had the opportunity to suggest or lead a breakout session, panel discussion or Q&A, and was encouraged to be as creative as possible.  Topics up for discussion ran the gamut of “sexy transit,” “building apps for livable streets,” and “the perils of privatization,” which resulted in delightful and sometimes unexpected conversations. Questions like, what makes a liveable street? Can mobile applications be built that facilitate street life? What are the best practices being deployed by transportation demand management groups across the globe? and How can social media be leveraged to generate more on the ground involvement? were asked.

The majority of the sessions were geared towards addressing the current reality: with accelerating technology and recent census figures pouring in, many municipal governments have unprecedented access to data sets and are trying to figure out what to do with them.  Attendees had the goal of brainstorming how to package this information in a way that is transparent, accountable, and efficient.

While attendees may not have arrived at any answers, there were definitely some concrete conclusions. Consensus abounded that information should be and wants to be made public, and that in order to facilitate and maintain democracy, it should be shared in a thoughtful and meaningful way. Attendees also agreed that nonprofit groups are essential at bridging the divide between public and private entities, and are well positioned to introduce new technologies to a diverse range of constituencies. Everyone acknowledged that web developers are notorious for existing in silos, and deemed it integral that they be encouraged, maybe even incentivized, to talk with citizens about how to build apps that would actually be useful and valuable to them. Groups like Code For America, which collaborates with selected cities throughout the United States to transform data into something which encourages citizen participation and civic building, were featured. 

What are your reactions? Could access to data really improve the transportation system? Are there mobile applications that would make you more likely to use transit? Would knowing the transportation habits of your co-workers make you want to change your behavior? Do you think real-time ridesharing could work in our region? What about connecting your transit pass to a carsharing service? The possibilities are as endless as a data set:  Share your thoughts below!

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011 2:07 PM | by admin | Comments (1)

Way to Work BellevueHave you ever heard of getting paid for trying a new commute? Didn’t think so. With Way to Work Bellevue , a new online commute incentive program, you could potentially earn up to $60 in gift cards to places like REI, Brown Bear Car Wash, Gregg’s Cycles, The Walking Company, Chevron and more! The deadline for signing up is Friday, February 18, so get on board while you still can! Here are the details:

Currently drive alone? Pledge to try a new way of getting to work and take these steps:

1) Fill out and turn in the Way to Work Bellevue sign up form.

2) Look for your sign up confirmation email containing a promotion code. 

3) Register on RideshareOnline.com.

4) Join the Way to Work Bellevue network. Search “Way to Work” under “Profile > My Networks” on RideshareOnline.com. Enter promotion code to join.

5) Begin logging your non-drive-alone commute trips on RideshareOnline.com’s trip calendar.

Just for pledging to try a new commute and registering on RideshareOnline.com, you will automatically receive a $10 gift card! Log 25 days or more of round trip non-drive-along commutes and you will automatically receive a $25 gift card! Monthly drawings for $50 gifts will also be made in February, March and April for those who continue to log their trips at least 3x per week. 

Already ride the bus, carpool, vanpool, bike or walk to work? Pledge to continue commuting the way you do:

1) Fill out and turn in the Way to Work Bellevue sign up form.

2) Look for your sign up confirmation email containing a promotion code. 

3) Register on RideshareOnline.com.

4) Join the Way to Work Bellevue Commute Pros network! Search “Way to Work” under “Profile > My Networks” on RideshareOnline.com. Enter promotion code.

5) Begin logging your non-drive-alone commute trips on RideshareOnline.com’s trip calendar.

Just for pledging to stick to your non-drive-alone commute and registering on RideshareOnline.com, you will automatically receive a $10 gift card! Monthly drawings for $50 gifts will also be made in February, March and April for those who log their trips at least 3x per week!

So what are you waiting for – sign up for Way to Work Bellevue today!

Friday, February 11th, 2011 5:21 PM | by admin | Add a Comment

Although it’s a little early to start preparing for Bike to Work Month in May (we’re still dealing with snow storms here people), our triple threat Commuter Spotlight provided some great inspiration for getting in shape this year. Meet Brad Shinn – the poster child for getting your workout in while cutting down commute costs and reducing your carbon footprint. Brad rides his bike, takes the ferry and finishes his commute to Downtown Bellevue on the bus!

Name:
Brad Shinn

Employer:
CH2MHILL

Commute Mode:
Bike + ferry + bus 

Distance One-Way:
11 miles on bike, about 30 miles total 

What does your bicycle commute entail?
I start out biking on Vashon Highway to the Fauntleroy or Downtown Ferry. Once I’m off the ferry, I bike to the Downtown Seattle Transit Tunnel and take the Sound Transit route 550 bus to the South Bellevue Park & Ride and finish off the last mile to the office on my bike. I bike five days a week unless I’m travelling. In the summer I usually add another leg—either Bellevue to Seattle or Seattle to Fauntleroy Ferry. 

How long have you been commuting by bicycle?
I started the day after Memorial Day weekend, three years ago. 

What do you like best about your biking commute?
There is so much I like about it—the time for reflection, the exercise, the feeling that I am minimizing my impact, the reliability. It also a good conversation starter, “you bike from where?” 

What motivates you to continue commuting by bicycle instead of taking another mode?
Believe it or not I started because I was tired of the unreliability of driving and inflexibility of taking the bus. My commute takes no more time than it did when I drove—except now I can control it. 

If you could improve one thing about the biking experience in Downtown Bellevue, what would it be?
I would say for the region, not just Bellevue, separate bike lines and more of them in congested downtown areas. 

What advice would you give to someone considering commuting by bicycle?
Get a good solid bike, spend the extra money on solid components so your bike is tough and reliable. Buy quality clothing that allow you to ride in any kind of weather—if you don’t you’ll find a million excuses not to ride on a rainy day.

Thursday, January 13th, 2011 1:03 PM | by admin | Add a Comment

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